What is it with Great Falls that we can't keep one of these in the city?  Are we just that headstrong in our ways that we won't ever try something like it?  Why won't people get out and support a businessperson that chooses to open one of these types of restaurants?

I know that we love it.  We just don't support it once we have it.

Why can't we keep and support a seafood restaurant in Great Falls?

Sure, You Can Still Order It Around Town, But Is It the Same?

I get it.  There are some amazing locations in Great Falls that offer delectable seafood for our consumption.  Even our grocery stores offer some great choices for taking a lobster or crab legs home.  But Great Falls just doesn't seem to want, need or even desire a designated seafood restaurant.  Long John Silver's anyone?

We've had them in the past, but alas, they never last more than a few years, if that.

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Has The Beef Council Just Brow Beat Us into Only Serving Cow?

Nothing is going to beat a great cut of meat.  I don't care how good that lobster is, or where my crab legs came from, I am a meat and potatoes kind of guy.  Always have, always will.  But that doesn't mean I don't appreciate a different meal to tease my palate.

Over the years, our city has a seen several seafood specialty type restaurants come to us, but never last long.  Why?  Are we just so ingrained with beef in our lives that we think we will be ridiculed because we want a scallop?

With so many types of food available in Great Falls, will we ever see another Long John Silver's or something like that be back?  Probably not, if they look at the history of those chains here.  But boy would I love to celebrate National Talk Like a Pirate Day at one in our fair city.  What do you think?  Why don't we have a proper seafood location in Great Falls?  Hit me up with your thoughts or ideas via the social media comment section, through our app chat feature or you can just email me here.

Beef Steaks, Ham, and Other Groceries That Rose in Price

Stacker used Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the grocery items that saw the largest price increases from April to May in the Midwest.